Passed away to the B-Side: why cremate when you can BE the groove eternal?

from Time.com:

The British company And Vinyly, who rewrote the well known RIP (Rest in Peace) to RIV — Rest in Vinyl. Specifically: the ashes of the deceased are processed into a working vinyl record. The simplest version costs $3,100, but that will get you 30 vinyl copies (enough for friends and relatives) onto which music or a recorded message can be pressed. One particularly spooky option: opt against a song or message and leave only the eerie crackling of ash to be heard on the blank disc.

Of course, it can all get much more extravagant. For $786, you can get a custom tune composed; and for a bit more cash, you can circulate your records in shops around the world….

Personally, the idea of being distributed into record stores around the world is kind of enticing. Records are natural testaments of the dreams of their creators, why not make them literal testaments of the creators themselves?

the sound and the chocolate

Fife [Scotland] baker Ben Milne may be used to his friends Ziggy and Tommy making sweet, sweet music, but now he’s given it a go himself with the creation of a playable 7 inch single made entirely of chocolate.

The delicious record, which plays a recognisable version of Anti-Climb Paint by Edinburgh-based band Found, works on all record players and is completely edible. Even the paper label can be eaten.

The idea came to baker Ben when he and his friends from the band decided to do something together. His first attempt saw him pour molten chocolate on to a regular vinyl disc, but he found out that it played the reverse of the song.”

[He ultimately used the same template that the vinyl discs themselves are pressed from].

Either I’m hungry or this is really sexy.  A couple of issues, though:  I imagine you could only play the record like twice before the soft chocolate grooves degrade to the point of becoming unlistenable, and the chocolate would probably REALLY jack up your needle.  Super cute though.  Party/Wedding favor?

more from Scotland’s STV website, including video of the record playing.

iPad app parrots a good old record player (pops and all)

A new app for Apple’s iPad called VinylLove is sort of like virtual reality: sort of realistic, but just fake enough to remind you why you dig real life in the first place. VinylLove is an app that displays your mp3’s “cover art” as something you can “flip” through in a pixelated “crate” (awwwww…), and even super-imposes crackles and pops onto your tracks as you play them to supposedly add depth to your listening experience.  I have thousands of records, and though my threshold for such surface noise is probably higher than your average digitalphile, I don’t think that such noise is what creates the fabled analog warmth.  My most satisfying record listening experiences lack any noticible extraneous noise.  The whole thing smacks of a gimmick, like a New Kids on the Block pillowcase circa 1990.  Besides, I like to flip through great big obsolete records… (not scroll down a screen).

Speaking of gimmicks… isn’t this mug (by Sunart) cute?

“Vinyl Gets its Groove Back” from chicagonow.com

In a world where advancing technology is the indication of progress in the arts – books and magazines are being replaced by e-readers and iPads and telephones that aren’t “smart” have become historical artifacts – where does nostalgia fit in?  Apparently, it’s found a nice home in the music industry, where record sales– of actual vinyl LPs and EPs— have been experiencing a renaissance.

Read more: http://www.chicagonow.com/blogs/via-chicago/2011/03/vinyl-gets-its-groove-back.html#ixzz1GDjujgf4

a groove. a print. a chair

009 Textiles, a West London based fabric design company has created this furniture homage to wax. The print consists of various vinyl singles against a white background, with the labels of each record adding splashes of colour to the design. Pretty cool.  I think I could co-sign on this if it came in a different background color.  White is kinda hard to live with in the real world.  The chair is available to buy from the My Deco Boutique for £2,382