Passed away to the B-Side: why cremate when you can BE the groove eternal?

from Time.com:

The British company And Vinyly, who rewrote the well known RIP (Rest in Peace) to RIV — Rest in Vinyl. Specifically: the ashes of the deceased are processed into a working vinyl record. The simplest version costs $3,100, but that will get you 30 vinyl copies (enough for friends and relatives) onto which music or a recorded message can be pressed. One particularly spooky option: opt against a song or message and leave only the eerie crackling of ash to be heard on the blank disc.

Of course, it can all get much more extravagant. For $786, you can get a custom tune composed; and for a bit more cash, you can circulate your records in shops around the world….

Personally, the idea of being distributed into record stores around the world is kind of enticing. Records are natural testaments of the dreams of their creators, why not make them literal testaments of the creators themselves?

the sound and the chocolate

Fife [Scotland] baker Ben Milne may be used to his friends Ziggy and Tommy making sweet, sweet music, but now he’s given it a go himself with the creation of a playable 7 inch single made entirely of chocolate.

The delicious record, which plays a recognisable version of Anti-Climb Paint by Edinburgh-based band Found, works on all record players and is completely edible. Even the paper label can be eaten.

The idea came to baker Ben when he and his friends from the band decided to do something together. His first attempt saw him pour molten chocolate on to a regular vinyl disc, but he found out that it played the reverse of the song.”

[He ultimately used the same template that the vinyl discs themselves are pressed from].

Either I’m hungry or this is really sexy.  A couple of issues, though:  I imagine you could only play the record like twice before the soft chocolate grooves degrade to the point of becoming unlistenable, and the chocolate would probably REALLY jack up your needle.  Super cute though.  Party/Wedding favor?

more from Scotland’s STV website, including video of the record playing.

“Vinyl Gets its Groove Back” from chicagonow.com

In a world where advancing technology is the indication of progress in the arts – books and magazines are being replaced by e-readers and iPads and telephones that aren’t “smart” have become historical artifacts – where does nostalgia fit in?  Apparently, it’s found a nice home in the music industry, where record sales– of actual vinyl LPs and EPs— have been experiencing a renaissance.

Read more: http://www.chicagonow.com/blogs/via-chicago/2011/03/vinyl-gets-its-groove-back.html#ixzz1GDjujgf4