the sound and the chocolate

Fife [Scotland] baker Ben Milne may be used to his friends Ziggy and Tommy making sweet, sweet music, but now he’s given it a go himself with the creation of a playable 7 inch single made entirely of chocolate.

The delicious record, which plays a recognisable version of Anti-Climb Paint by Edinburgh-based band Found, works on all record players and is completely edible. Even the paper label can be eaten.

The idea came to baker Ben when he and his friends from the band decided to do something together. His first attempt saw him pour molten chocolate on to a regular vinyl disc, but he found out that it played the reverse of the song.”

[He ultimately used the same template that the vinyl discs themselves are pressed from].

Either I’m hungry or this is really sexy.  A couple of issues, though:  I imagine you could only play the record like twice before the soft chocolate grooves degrade to the point of becoming unlistenable, and the chocolate would probably REALLY jack up your needle.  Super cute though.  Party/Wedding favor?

more from Scotland’s STV website, including video of the record playing.

Is Buying Records online Ironic?

“But ponder the process: You (we) go into the digital ether — probably after downloading a track or streaming a video of what we’re about to buy — and order some other person to mail us a piece of 1890s technology. In return, we give them digital payment information which they then use — working in that same newfangled ether — to make our digitally stored money numbers get smaller and theirs larger. All this high-tech action for an old-school piece of plastic.

Then there’s the phonograph technology itself, which is of course the epitome of analog: A needle runs along a groove cut into a piece of vinyl, then sends out a signal based on its tiny movements. Yet somehow this technology — which is older than airplanes, television, transistor radios, the modern map of Europe, women’s suffrage, and lots of other things we take for granted — is still the preferred way of listening to music for a lot of people. The Internet hasn’t changed shit — it just gets the records to our doorstep faster, and lets us buy ones the local shops don’t have.”

—from Ian S. Port, SF Weekly

from The Boston Globe: “Groove is in the art”

On the screen, a man with a sharp knife taped to his face chops an apple on a moving turntable. It’s an odd and twisted moment. So is another, of the same guy, burying a record player in a shallow grave. The dirt suffocates a syrupy, candy pop song.

“I only use records I hate,’’ said the Japanese artist Taiyo Kimura, explaining the contents on the screen as he stood in [Boston’s] Institute of Contemporary Art earlier this week.

“Haunted by You,’’ his short film, is just one of more than 100 pieces in “The Record: Contemporary ART and VINYL,’’ which opens today at the ICA….. click here for more….

Turntable goes minimalist (originally published February 2010)

The little guy pictured above is a Linos Portable USB vinyl record player (never would have guessed it). How does it work, you ask?

Hook the wire into your computer. The bar has two parts. Take out the bottom base, place the long play album or single on top, and then sandwich it with the overarching top. To start playing, move the player arm into position. Bananas, right? Pop it in your pocket and you’re good to go (so long as you have a computer or something that accepts a USB cord handy).

Probably not the best option for that $200 impossibly rare mint copy, but cool beans for that $1.99 joint. Definitely a fun choice for a beginning collector.

thanks to Gizmodo for the info.

Robin Cooksley’s 21st Century Console

Custom built by a North Carolina-based woodworker, this retro record player cabinet, houses all your audio components and even has integrated speakers. The unit is made from walnut and baltic birch plywood. The doors have a wave effect carved into them echoing the sound waves from the speakers. The unit incorporates some traditional joinery such as dovetail joints. The cabinet can be fully customized to your exact needs, in regards to the size of your components, choice of wood species, whether to incorporate the speakers or more storage space, Ipod docs etc. Contact robincooksley@hotmail.com for a quote and shipping information.